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the planet's ever seen. >> reporter: he assures us nothing can go wrong with this fish, altered by science to grow and get to market faster. >> this fish is identical in every measurable way. >> reporter: have we gone too far? >> i wouldn't want to eat this fish, unless it's gone through a proper approval process. >> reporter: critics say the fda scientists didn't do enough independent work and used company data to come to its safety conclusions. some of which tested only six fish. >> that kind of science wouldn't make it past a high school science fair. >> reporter: is this something i should be afraid of? >> you eat dna every time you swallow. you consume dna with every food you eat. >> reporter: altered dna? >> the gene comes from the chinook salmon. pacific salmon. that protein is identical to the same protein that's produced by the atlantic salmon. >> reporter: and nothing's going to happen to me or my children if they eat this fish? >> it will make you healthier. man has been altering the nature of animals since man walked upright and began domesticating animals. the beef that we con
that, but on the theological debate, that's how do you reconcile with science definitively establishes what your what faith teaches? with the age of the earth, there's no conflict. in the beginning, god created the heavens and earth, and the scientific advances allowed us, given us insight into when and how he did it, but i believe god did it. that's how i reconcile that. that's consistent with the teachings of my church. other people have a deeper con flipght. i think in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever we believe, and that means teaching them science. they have to know science, but parents have the right to teach theology and reconcile the two things as they believe and see fit, and i think that's the point the president was making back in 2007 when he was asked the question. that's what i was saying. >> accepting that, how old is the earth? >> science says it's -- my faith teaches it's not inconsistent, but god great created the universe. god creates help and earth, and science gives us insight. the more science learned, the more i'm convinced that
. they produce products that and for public opinion, she policies, and advanced science, engineering, and madison. that question is complicated, and nrc leaders put together a panel of people that represented a broad range of disciplines. they convene the leaders from business and industry, academy, and government and the national laboratories. i had the privilege of being a member of that panel. because congress asked for 10 actions that to be taken to shore up universities, restructured our report around 10 recommendations with a time frame of the next 5-10 years. one recommendation focused on policies affecting the flow of international scholars and students to the u.s. more and more international students are inclined to come to our research universities. uva has had a 60% increase in such applications in the last three years alone. that has been fueled largely by applications from chinese students. the u.s. benefits when talented students and faculty come to the country to study and conduct research. the benefit even more if they stay in the u.s. to work after they graduate. it is in our nat
in the movie. started with the christian science upon ter's innocent question, will stephen colbert appear in the hobbit? followed by "the hollywood reporter" as stephen colbert to make cameo in the hobbit. and then the bombshell examiner headline, the hobbit movie news stephen colbert to star in lord of the rings prequel. i have to say-- i have to say that was an exciting and unverified escalation of my career. but is any of it true? well, my lips are sealed. but let me ask you this: if i did not appear in the hobbit trilogy, why do i have the elvish blade string. (cheers and applause) one of the original stings used in the lord of the ring the trilogy, where did i get t find it in a mountain troll cave or is it just some prop. oh no, this was made in gondolin before the fall. (cheers and applause) nation, i love new york city. the big apple, the city that never sleeps, rat xanadu. so i was crushed to learn the metropolis i know and love has changed, not one person was murdered in new york city on monday. nypd deputy commissioner paul brown couldn't even remember the last time a day went
. that is generally where people go. if you are going to be 17th in math and science, and eventually you will lose the innovation race. you're not going to be able to educate people for the jobs available. those jobs will go elsewhere. our global growth and competitiveness. that in some ways is the most obvious link. if we are not preparing people for the workplace of the 21st century, we are not going to lobby the world's most competitive and innovative economy. the former chief -- secretary of the army talked-about the problems in our education system and the relationship to the armed forces. the inability of 70% of americans to actually qualify for service and into the armed forces ought to be a red flag for anyone. there are other reasons for that -- incarceration, obesity. but a fair amount is people cannot pass the basic skills test to get into the military. just imagine that. a country, the most artful country in the world -- the most powerful country in the world and make cannot get people to pass a skills test to enter the army. few people start to learn foreign languages in a timely fash
.5 billion. doug mcelway has the story. >> we realize it is the stuff of science fiction. we intend to make it science fact. >> it would appear too incredible. except these former nasa managers are credible and experienced. calling their project golden spike. they planned to send man back to the moon within a decade on commercial spacecraft at a cost of $7 billion to $8 billion. >> our vision is to create a reliable and affordable u.s. base imher shall -- commercial trans transportation system. it is from virtually any nation or any corporation. or any individual. >> reporter: -- >> for many robotic missions they know the moon is tapping. >> it is rich in platinum and other elements of exotic value are there in huge quantity. >> helium 3 which does not exist in sufficient quantities on earth is plentiful on the moon. it could be mined and returned to earth to provide fuel for nuclear fusion which unlining the fission powered reactors leaves little radio active waste. >> and liftoff. >> extreme frugality is factored into the planning. >> adapt crew capsules that are already in development. o
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
another crack at that science question. clarify an answer he gave to "gq" when he was asked about the age of the earth. remember, senator rubio took a little grief, saying that he was not qualified to answer the question, calling it, quote, one of life's great mysteries. remember, i'm not a scientist, man, the whole thing. yesterday, mike, i guess you spoke to him as part of the "playbook" breakfast and you gave him a chance to explain that answer. let's listen. >> how old do you think the earth is? >> first of all, the answer i gave was trying to make the same point the president made a few years ago, and that is there is no scientific debate on the age of the earth. i mean, it's established it. pretty definitively. at least 4.5 billion years old. i was referring to a theological debate which is a pretty healthy debate. >> mike, what did you come away with talking to marco rubio yesterday? >> people in the room came away thinking that he was really smooth, really on his game. and this is an example of that. he had that very clumsy sort of dismissive answer when he was asked by "gq" befor
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. we have important breaking news. nbc news is reporting u.s. officials say their worst fears have been confirmed the syrian military has loaded chemical weapons inside bombs. nbc says those same officials say bashar al assad's forces are awaiting final order to use those loaded missiles against syria's own people. this video posted online, which we can't independently verify, purports to show syrian missiles that have been modified to carry chemical and biological weapons. obviously, this is a sober development in a situation that seems to be getting worse by the day. pentagon correspondent barbara starr joins me along with cnn contributor and former cia officer bob baer and on the phone fran townsend. barbara, i know you're working to confirm this nbc report. how much would this change the situation? if u.s. military is going to act to prevent assad from gassing his own people, it would seem, if they loaded this stuff into weapons, the time to do it would be at hand. >> right now i can t
-level political science classes in college. you talk about the rationale act or model. assuming al assad is a rational actor, even if he thinks he may lose and need a place to go some day like russia or be able to live in exile somewhere, just rationally speaking, it would not make sense for him to use these weapons, would it? >> well, we have to look at the generals around him. he's not alone in this. he's not a single man making these decisions. there are a group of generals from his own promotion which are controlling this war. they are not being offered a way out. you know, and the way they look at it, i've spent a lot of time with these people. they're virtually a cult. they think their survival's at stake. even if the united states were to enter in any sort of -- you know, to go in and get the weapons, that would be a better option for them than to losing to the rebels who they consider terrorists, fundamentalists, whatever you want. and their chances are dimming by the day. and they're very desperate and they are this closed-in mentality. it's unpredictable exactly what they're go
and science and technology. >> yeah, absolutely. that's one of the big things is we want to show how to do science and engineering on the show and we want to make it fun. a lot of this science shows, ten minute noose them, you fall asleep or whatever. that's one of the reasons we blow stuff up, we launch rockets, because we've got to get this next generation of kids interested in doing science engineering and math. >> brian: i still can't get through a whole episode of "electric company." steve, you remember we got in trouble for saying red neck on television? >> steve: right. >> brian: we got written up how numb we were to the people in the south. you're saying red neck is misunderstood. >> completely misunderstood. look up the history of the word. nowhere in its history was it used as derogatory term. it's only been in the last few decades that that's used on tv. in the south, it really is a term of endearment, if you think about it. it's hard work sharecroppers who had to be resourceful. everything they had was on the farm. if something broke, they had to fix it. when we moved the germa
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] while you're getting ready for the holidays, we're getting ready for you. tis the season. for food, for family, and now, something extra -- for you. ♪ ♪ >> bob: the most wonderful time of the year in more ways than one. last night was one of the great days that happens in america every year. the annual victoria secret fashion show. roll the tape. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> bob: okay. now among other things they had, they showed a $2.5 million bra. the diamond studded one. you ever want to wear one of those? >> kimberly: i got one of those. came with a free tote bag. >> bob: did it? >> kimberly: no. >> bob: maybe fashion conscious, what are the wings for? >> kimberly: that is just because angels, baby. >> greg: this is outrageous they would be wearing wings. >> dana: they should call it victorious -- victoria secret christmas show and then everybody would turn against the atheists. >> bob: this one of the biggest nights -- this started out as
on on the treadmill. does anyone have? @%e national science foundation studying the effects on disease. they decided to do this, and they spend 500,000 taxpayer dollars doing this study. if you can get scientists to waste money, the senator is back with another study. this time uncovering waste of the department of homeland security. and there was plenty of it. first, zombies apocalypse training. i know, crazy. part of our homeland response. they were betrayed by actors who were gunned down by a military unit. training occurred at a weeklong conference held at turner's point resort and spa. the cost worth the bargain of a thousand dollars. now we know how to protect ourselves from zombies. then there is columbus, ohio. an underwater robot. christ had a $98,000. the robot has a camera that provides a video this way to a vehicle on shore. i but i have to tell you that i don't know why, because columbus, ohio, the capital of ohio is wehrmacht. great lakes are up here. officials declared emergency because of grant deadlines. not to be outdone, seattle and a remote control helicopter. not really an issue
innovators among charities increase education for girls and minority students in science and technology. seven nonprofit will win the first global global impact awards today. among them $5 million to water, a group that drill wells for water across africa. and $5 million to donors choose a doctor or for new investors is a science and math classes with the college board for under represent students. google says innovations is underfunded among nonprofits. >> we will be back in a minute welcome back the time is 4 :15. the bay area continue to conducclean up the aftermathf a storm that knocked down trees and cut the power for thousands. the trees all over were not down on to cars and homes and power was cut to thousands. the rain is being partly blamed for causing giant sinkhole here in lafayette. workers spent most of the day cleaning up the hole with holes, as the raiders and dump trucks. city officials say an expose a foot storm pipe was designed to save for transport water underneath the road but somehow failed. the road keeton sunday morning creating a crack crater that is 80 ft. long
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
an extension of science and technology, but i wanted to know what it meant to us, to humanity, to us then and to generations in the future, and i wasn't sure, but all i knew is that the world and the earth and the small part of the universe that i was privileged to see was not an accident, that there is a creator of this universe. and i had the opportunity, a few others have to sit on god's front porch and see a small part of it. and that's what i came home w. the science and technology is obsolete the next day, but the spirit, the meaning, and what neil just said a minute ago, it proved that period of time proved that individually and collectively as a nation we dedicate ourselves to a cause, there is nothing, nothing absolutely that we can't do. all we've got to do is decide to do it, whether it's go to the moon or solve the world crisis, forget off this financial cliff, or whatever, we have to be bold, be bold. bill: thank you, gene. really appreciate that. >> god bless. bill: check it out. job well done. check it out. fly me in the moon here on the fox news channel 9:00 eastern t
placement courses in math and science more than a dozen bay area schools. the owners to use that word will distribute the money through a competitive process. the process is known as the '80s them program. it encourages traditionally underrepresented female and minority students to demonstrate strong academic potential to explore science, technology, engineering and math, or stem, courses and consider careers in those areas. more than 139 schools around california are adults eligible to participate in the a piece stem access program. schools from alameda county san mateo county and santa clara can apply. the raiders >> the writer is taking on the denver broncos at the coliseum last night.broncos quarterback paid manning throughout his 30th touchdown pass of the season at the game's opening drive. they beat the raiders 26 to 13 last night. carson, threw one interception that thwarted a possible scoring chance the raiders. lost a fumble was set up a touchdown for the broncos of open its sixth straight game. the raiders will take on the kansas city chiefs' next sunday december 16th at th
and that's why they oppose david lee, thank you. it's not rocket science. that today from vice president joe biden on lawmaker's efforts to prevent a potential economic crisis. he says the so-called fiscal cliff problem could be fixed in 15 minutes if republicans would only agree to higher taxes on higher americans. the v.p. laid out the president's plan at a diner in virginia. the campaign style stop apparently meant to highlight going over the fiscal cliff would mean for the fiscal class. >> i don't know why at love the guys we work with don't get it makes a difference whether or not you can finance a used car. 3,000 bucks makes a difference or talk about whether or not your kids are going to be able to save enough for their college. >> shepard: so where are we? we are 25 days away from a series of automatic spending cuts and expiring tax credits or tax cuts anyway? economists say that would be a disaster. possibly costing million of american jobs. today the house speaker john boehner again accused the white house of holding up negotiations. he said the white house has wasted another w
... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to ot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stss. fedex office. >> the big story this morning is a big name and you know it and probably own it. apple had its worst trading day in four years and it's facing real competition from the samsung galaxy, its smart phone market in china is down, but perhaps more importantly, investors are selling, piling out, taking profits before the new year when the tax on profit goes up. if you have an american-based mutual fund, apple is probably in it. let's look at apple's stock price pre-market right now. i'm afraid ladies and gentlemen, we're down again and it's probably going to open $9 lower than yesterday. and nicole is on the floor of the new york stock exchange, and tell me, is anybody down there talking about apple at this price as a buying opportunity? >> 100%, everybody is talking about apple. when i'm talking to traders what they're
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit care.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >> sean: this is a fox news alert. a u.s. official con firs confirx news that the syrian government has mixed one of the most dangerous chemical warfare agents called sarin gas. this is from reports that president assad is considering using chemical weapons against his own people. the gas is odorless, colorless, tasteless. we'll continue to monitor the situation out of syria but first the protests in cairo are swelling tonight. egyptians continue to rally in the streets in opposition to the power grab by by islamist president morsi. the brunt of the struggle now seems to be felt by the women. activists are reporting that
? the answer is part of our science roundup online. hari sreenivasan has the details. >> sreenivasan: the image resembles a lite-bright time lapse. find those pictures and our conversation with a software developer who set out to sualize the 24-hour cycle of urban public transit systems. that's on our homepage. an international telecommunications conference in dubai aims to set new rules for the internet. what's at stake? we take a look in the rundown. and on making sense, economics correspondent paul solman argues both sides of the capital gains tax debate. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. judy? >> woodruff: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions
, no matter howily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. at legalzoom, we've created better place to handle your legaleeds. maybe you have estions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorn to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable lal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. david: it's kind of hard to get a fix on what the market was doing towards the end of the day. let's go back down to the cme to see how s&p futures are closing right now with tim. go ahead, tim. >> yeah. closing on the high of the day. you know, real lackluster, holiday-like session ahead of tomorrow, and that's really been the flavor of the past, y
is with us. the science is clear. national security establishments all know that this is real. there is a rearguard action in this building but i polluters to try to prevent us in taking action on this. we have to face the fact that deniers are wrong. they are just dead wrong. whatever motivations may be, they are wrong and we have to deal with that and i think some of the courtesy we've given to one another collegially really have to yield to the fact that some of the things said in the senate and equitably in this committee chamber just plain wrong. sandy shows the price of not being attentive to these facts in a thank you for your leadership, madam chair. >> senator, i want to thank you for your remarks. i feel, as you do, that the clock is ticking and hurricane sandy has shown us all what the scientist sitting right in this room today i got the goupil all were sitting right there and told us exactly what would happen and it's all happening. you can close your eyes and cover your ears and put a pillow over your head, but anyone with a heart beat and he pulls can tell that t
including the institute of medicine of the national academy of sciences that has looked at this and there is no connection. host: north carolina. republican line. you are on, sir. caller: this is gary. are there flu shots you could take that do not have egg? i am allergic. host: -- host: dr. frieden? guest: most reactions to eggs are not actual the other's reactions. and this to develop hives or have trouble breathing, you should not worry. host: democrats line. laura. caller: i'm a 49-year-old african american. back in the day my parents used to give me this thing called father john. they made sure they gave us our vaccination, however i have learned that bad stuff builds up in -- that stuff buildup in the immune system. i also take cod liver oil. my daughter thinks that is the worst stuff, but she has never had the flu. i think sometimes we forget there were things we did not have in the past, and the things that people were taking to keep people alive, and just with the air we breathed now, it is dangerous. people could reflect on some of the things that old people ta
impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit, you showed what persistence to make sure your area was treated fairly. even though i must tell you many of us were not a joyful to hear your requests but never the less the outcome was great. you have set an example. our country has to be prepared to protect its supporters whether it is from the military or other kinds of encouragement or as the establishment of a program that says if you build and live here, that your route should not be taken away from you without the government helping to restore things. one of the questions i thought about when i heard you had this assignment is how much you had to do with this. it may take a long time to solve the problem. we commend you for your work. ad
the science behind every shape, size and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital patterns re-create shapes already found in nature and 3d layering creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. but developers already have one eye on tomorrow. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is it. >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflage, he's invisible. >> my body's gone. >> reporter: how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make believe. the military has seen this quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even conceal most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper hiding in a field or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could
income and if you don't have income you can't pay income taxes. that's not rocket science. got to get folks back to work and more, mr. speaker. if you're a family of four and you're earning $30,000 a year, you can't afford to pay the bills of this country in the same way that someone making $200,000 a year can. that's ok. we understand that. that's why there are graduated rates in the income tax code. some people 10%. some people pay 15%. some people pay 25%. some people pay in the 30's. the more you have the more we think you're able to contribute, but here we are in what every american economist would agree is one of the most dire economic circumstances of our time and what i hear described as leadership from the president is don't change anything for the 80%. in fact, spend more on the 80% and go tap that last 1% to pay all the bills. the top 1% are already paying all the bills. . this chart i would say demonstrates a moral imperative that we have the and grapple with as american citizens, as members of the greatest self-ruling nation the history of the world, what we have already
. that is what inspires people to go into heart fields like science and genering. they accomplish things in space but help defend our country and have innovations that keep our economy vibrant. >> it is a lot easier as a kid to look at some of the pictures we're watching now, some of the lunar explorers. the last lunar mission was taking place 40 years ago this week. it was a lot easier to get excited when you see, there's gene cernan bouncing around in moondust. when you have, i don't know, when you have just the robot up there on mars, yeah it is doing great work but not exactly a human connection. is that still inspiring kids today? >> i think there is a lack of near-term excitement. what's nasa doing now? what is it going to do the next five years for a college graduate looking for a job? my daughter is a aerospace engineering grad student looking to work in the space program but there is question whether there will be those opportunities. the robot is great but we need the human connection so we experience that ourselves with our machines we send out as scouts in advance. nasa needs a purpos
. and high-tech cars it used to be the thing of science fiction or high-end luxury cars but now, changes with gabe slate tech report. from ford. >> this new technology that we are seeing is amazing. it typically, these high-tech features are only in really expensive luxury sedans. costs over $60,000 but that is all changing. ford is building and some really cool new high-tech features into their affordable cars. and trucks. >> this is the new technology being implemented and 24 vehicles. the keys are a thing of the past. this will work with eight key fob derange. also, the-key fog is in the range, which also with the handsfree killed eight, if it is also in range, the hands free to locat tailgate itl activate the liftgate to opened and it will up to the same to shot in the liftgate. this front panel also will control your gps, and other functions it is like a tablet with a touch screen that offers easier and safer and also will double as a rear camera. it is a great way to avoid accidents, red, yellow, green and guides tha wind blowing up. helping. and also, that will help you guide you
in an edition of popular science that there was an experimental program called the invisible i and it was a program that was a precursor to the contact lenses. so he got on the train, went into new york and got enrolled in the program and got his set of invisible eyes. so he went to the recruiting station and watched how they did the examination. he watched the navy and the navy had one line. he would go down the line and get your physical exam. he would get your psychological exam and then your eye exam. then he watched the coast guard and the coast guard had two lines. the first one was for your physical exam and then your psychological exam and then if you pass that they told you to get into the other line for your eye exam. so he figured that would give him just enough time to slip the contact lenses into his eyes, which he did. the recruiter said, read the bottom line. he said, how far down? he said as far read retro so the sailor read. he said what you're reading? he said i'm reading the bottom line. he said, you are reading patent sentence so you clearly have the eyes of
money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salads, sandwiches, and more. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's a "the stephanie miller show." ♪ i'm walkin' on sunshine ♪ ♪ i'm walkin' on sunshine ♪ ♪ and it's time to feel good ♪ ♪ hey, all right now ♪ ♪ and it's time to feel good ♪ >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." chuckling warmly over -- jim's hobby. getting irritated by the people that comment on yahoo stories. >> the yahoos who comment on yahoo about the kennedy center awards last night. take your honors and shove it up your collective socialist butt starting with you socialist in chief. >> what? >> stephanie: the other one.
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. 1c >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ you may be right, i may be crazy ♪ ♪ you may be wrong but all i know, you may be right ♪ >> stephanie: it is "the stephanie miller show." welcome to it. 23 minutes after the hour. the rude pundit in hour three today. eric boehlert coming up to cohost right-wing world at the top of the hour. all right. so lots going on. it is getting fiscal cliffy around here. [ ♪ "world news tonight" ♪ ] nancy pelosi is threatening to force a vote on the bush tax cuts for the middle class. friday, yeah the house -- g.o.p. will not hold a vote on the middle class tax bill. >> not going to do anything. >> stephanie: he will be over there making a mitch face. >> i don't feel like it. this is stupid. >> stephanie: the senate has approved one in response, nancy pelosi announced democrats plan to bring the legislation to the floor vote no matter what. d
from mars but in reality once we decide what we're going to do we have a science operational working group. we decide what we're going to do and the sol is a martian day. we write the script. we program -- we write the program. that takes about six hours to write. and then it gets sent from the deep space network to mars where the rover picks it up and the rover does all of those operations during that day. it gets that information first thing in the morning and then it is with us all day long. you program an entire day in one sitting. >> i love that name. did you say deep mars network? >> deep space. reporting live from the deep space network. so that's interesting. why do a whole day's worth of instructions at one time? is it more efficient form the machine? does it -- >> there's always this 20-minute light delay. in writing the program writing the scripts it's called, takes a little bit of time to do. we have to get together and review things. doing it in real time is inefficient. the way the rover wo
: coming up, you hear about it all the time. seniors falling victim to fraud. now there is science that explains why. then he was the first living person to be awarded the medal of honor in decades. he's telling his story. he's hanging out with pete, the guy who got his home fixed after the storm [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? often comes with a set of equally impressive instructions ? shouldn't something that's truly advanced, not need much explanation at all ? with the nokia lumia 822 on verizon, there's not much to learn because it's powered by windows... to let you do more than you ever imagined on your smartphone. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of your plan. only on verizon. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and mo
a cupcake right before bed, ken jennings? >> i would. science has forced me. >> thumb sucking, bad for you. >> your dentist is right and psychiatrist was wrong. >> what is the biggest misconception? what is the wrongest advice that parents give to their kids? >> the thing i always -- this one is sort of serious. don't talk to strangers and parents take this very seriously and make their kids scared of strangers. this myth of a strange kidnapper in white van, that never happens. kids need to be comfortable talking to strangers so if they get lost they can find help. >> ken jennings, nice to have you with us. you can have breakfast, you can pick up the food off floort and you can run with scissors. >>> still ahead this morning, relentless rain to tell you about in the west that's already proven deadly. more rough weather on the way. we'll talk about that. and don't waste any time getting that flu shot this year. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you
. they want o make sure that science and engineers that are educated here in america or that have great ideas and want to be in america have a chance to come here. that has been difficult over the years. that is something that can get done, but i think they will run into some opposition because people who want a more comprehensive bill that would deal with farm labor, for example, they are worried that if you get that one bill done that helps the business community with the smartest and brightest immigrants, that you won't be dealing with everybody and i think that that will be the rub. >> steve: kay bailey hutchison has got legislation in the senate. we'll see if anything happens there. apparently at the white house yesterday, some blogger was standing this and said hey, look there, goes rachel madow. and then, hey, it's al sharpton. there goes -- what were all the msnbc guys doing at the white house? apparently they were invited by the white house to talk about what the president's pitch is regarding the fiscal cliff. he's been adamant, the top 2% have to pay a higher tax rate and apparentl
actual science and claims management. our new role is to create an integrated delivery model driven by primary care providers that use and share data at the point of care, to improve expwrowt comes, -- outcomes, lower cost, and create a better health care experience. at humana, our model integrates delivery, data support for clinicians, pharmaceuticals, and wellness and productivity platforms. in many ways, our model is an evolution with its roots prevalent 20-30 years ago. today's simplicity is the key. we believe in integrated model that emphasizes primary care that can provide outcomes or the cost of care, and, especially to patients with critical or complex medical needs including the patients in the medicare and medicaid programs. the con cement relies on primary care physicians to coordinate care for patients helping them navigate the health care system so they can receive the right care, the right place, at the right time. like many organizations and industries, technology plays such an important role in enabling this to happen. we are investing in today, data analytics capab
if there were science of axel rant used. but inside the building, there are fire investigators, police are also here on the scene. again, they consider this a suspicious fire. they're gathering and sifting through some of the evidence out here. but you can see that the restaurant, again from park to oak street is shut down to traffic. and it's going to be closed for the next hour or so while they continue the investigation. >>> we're learning more about the fan who fell from the third deck thursday night's raider's became. he's still hospitalized in serious condition with broken bones and other injuries. police have called it a deliberate act, but say it's unclear if the teenager had an understanding of the actions. a preliminary investigation revealed that the teen jumped or climbed over a wall and fell. >>> kansas city police have released two dash board videos related to the murder suicide of the chief's line backer belcher. in the first, he is asleep outside the apartment complex at 3:00 a.m. last saturday just hours before he killed his girlfriend and shot himself. police say he said he wa
bride. >> alisyn: modern science. >> clayton: welcome back to "fox & friends" this sunday and hope you're gearing up for a great christmas holiday and hope maybe you've gotten shopping done. and perhaps you haven't. we need to pay attention to this we've been talking throughout the show about the six gifts you should never give anyone, the gift that's all about me, like a photo of yourself or the book you hope you'll read because they're not going to read it. a pre gifting gift, also. >> trying to show off gift. >> aren't i cool. >> a gift that sends a message. >> like here is a gym membership. >> right. >> alisyn: so you shared with us, some of the worst gifts you've gotten and given. this is from michael in ohio, my wife wanted a storm door and like an idiot, i got her what i wanted, men are so stupid. >> clayton: michael, this is the problem, we're told we need to listen to our wives and women. >> alisyn: not when we say we want an appliance. and not when-- >> and a vacuum. when you say, honey, i want a vacuum. >> alisyn: not for christmas. a random day. >> and he goes out to target and buys y
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